The Most Hated Movie Casting Choices Of All Time

The right choice of actors can truly make or break a movie – and many box office flops are born from horrible casting choices. Whether it’s an actor who can’t help but provoke laughter in serious roles, or one whose popular public image clashes completely with an unsavoury character, miscast roles can be particularly embarrassing for Hollywood. Here are 10 of the most baffling and hated casting decisions in cinematic history.

10. Jared Leto in Suicide Squad

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Jared Leto faced a mammoth task in reviving DC villain the Joker, last portrayed on the big screen by the phenomenal Heath Ledger. But Leto’s swaggering, flashy Joker in 2016’s Suicide Squad failed to impress, or even scare.

Critic Billy Givens described Leto’s Joker as a “psychotic romantic more concerned with being cool than with sowing his usual chaos.”

9. Mike Myers in The Cat in the Hat

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As The Cat in the Hat, legendary comedian Mike Myers was a little out of his comfort zone. His adult humour felt completely wrong in this children’s fantasy movie, which garnered 10 Golden Raspberry Awards.

8. Marlon Wayans in Little Man

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In 2006’s Little Man, Marlon Wayans plays a short jewel thief who goes undercover as a baby. Wayans’ face was superimposed onto a nine-year-old actor with dwarfism, leading critic Mark Kermode to describe this film as “possessed by the devil”.

7. Angelina Jolie in Alexander

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If Colin Farrell wasn’t a strange enough choice to play the titular ancient king in Alexander, the decision to cast Angelina Jolie as his mother was even more bizarre. Though she plays Queen Olympias in the film, Jolie is in fact only one year older than Farrell.

6. John Cusack in The Butler

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John Cusack flopped as President Richard Nixon in The Butler – probably because he was just too likeable! Known for playing charming romantic leads, Cusack was unconvincing as this controversial leader.

5. Nicolas Cage in Ghost Rider

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Nicolas Cage turned the comic book character Johnny Blaze – a lovable thrill-seeker – into a more sensitive, serious figure.

Plenty of comic fans were displeased with this casting choice, and both Ghost Rider and its sequel Spirit of Vengeance were panned by critics.

4. Ryan Reynolds in Green Lantern

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Now a sensation as Deadpool, Ryan Reynolds is always the first to mock his past attempt at a superhero role. Off-the-wall Reynolds was wasted in 2011’s Green Lantern as Hal Jordan, a straight-laced pilot who is chosen to save the world.

This actor has since pretended in jest that he has never even heard of Green Lantern.

3. Sean Connery in The Untouchables

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Sean Connery won an Academy Award for playing Irish-American cop Jim Malone in The Untouchables, back in 1987.

But in a recent Empire Magazine poll, fans voted that Jim Malone had the worst movie accent of all time. In Connery’s typical fashion, he floats back to his own Scottish accent throughout the film.

2. Scarlett Johansson in Ghost in the Shell

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The 2017 movie Ghost in the Shell cast Scarlett Johansson in her most controversial role to date. She plays Motoko Kusanagi, a Japanese character who originates from a manga franchise dating back to 1989.

While Johansson’s performance was praised by critics, many fans felt a Japanese actress should have taken this iconic role. The film flopped at the box office.

1. Ashton Kutcher in Jobs

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Best known for playing comic and often ditzy roles, Ashton Kutcher was an unconvincing choice to play tech genius Steve Jobs in this 2015 drama.

It was another box office flop, and E!Online even described Kutcher’s role as a “superficial and unsatisfying portrait of an icon who deserved better.”