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30 Things You May Have Missed In Terminator 2: Judgment Day

30 Things You May Have Missed In Terminator 2: Judgment Day

As you may know, Judgement Day was on 29th August 1997, when 3 billion human lives ended. Luckily, despite what you may have seen on the news recently, this was only make-believe, resulting in the fictional survivors of the nuclear fire facing a new nightmare; the war against the machines…

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The film stars Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, Robert Patrick, and Edward Furlong as its principal cast. It is the sequel to the 1984 film The Terminator, and the second installment in the Terminator franchise.

The pre-production was plagues with legal disputed that resulted in Mario Kassar of Carolco Pictures having the franchise’s property rights in early 1990. This meant that the screenplay could be completed by a Cameron-led production team, and that filming could begin in October of 1990 with a shortened 186-day filming schedule.

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The production of Terminator 2 required a budget of approximately $100 million making it the most expensive film made up to that point. Much of the film’s massive budget was spent on filming and special effects. The film was released on July 3, 1991, in time for the U.S. Independence Day weekend. In 2017, Terminator 2 was re-released in 3D, 4K resolution for AMC and Cineplex theaters. The re-release debuted at number one in the United Kingdom during the weekend of its release.

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So make sure you’ll ‘be back’ in time to find some clothes, some boots and a motorcycle, because here are ‘12 Things You May Have Missed In Terminator 2: Judgment Day’…

1. Edward Furlong’s Voice Broke During Filming

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Because Terminator 2: Judgement Day took so long to film, Edward Furlong visibly aged during the shoot. Upon watching it you can see that he is much younger in the desert, and his voice also began to break and had to be pitched up one level in post production. Some of his lines had to be dubbed over.

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2. Arnie’s Dollar To Word Ratio Was Pretty Decent

We all know that The Terminator doesn’t have too much to say, which means that in the second film, Arnie got paid $21,429 for each word he uttered! In this respect, “Hasta la vista, baby” cost $85,716.

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Of course, Arnie does much more in the film than just speak, so we think it was money well spent!

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3. They Were Filming The Night Of The Rodney King Beating

During the audio commentary of the film, James Cameron has revealed that not only was the biker bar scene filmed across the street from where police officers beat Rodney King, but that they were filming the night of the beating.

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Cameron got the idea for Strange Days when the outcome of the verdict was announced on April 29th 1992.

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4. The T-1000’s Head Blew Apart Before Being Shot

Do you remember the famous shot where Arnie shoots the T-1000 point blank in the head with a shotgun? If you pay close attention to the scene, you can see that the head is already semi-blown apart before the shot is even fired! This is often pointed out in lists of movie mistakes.

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5. Linda Hamilton Learned How To Pick Locks For Real

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Linda Hamilton actually learned to pick locks for the scene in the hospital where she picks a lock with a paperclip. Could she not have just pretended? She also trained with former Israeli commando Uzi Gal and with personal trainer Anthony Cortes for three hours a day, six days a week for thirteen weeks before filming. Under both, she trained intensely with weights and learned judo and heavy military training techniques.

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6. Arnie’s Got Wires

In several shots you can clearly see supposedly ‘hidden’ wires controlling things like Arnie’s mechanical arm. Talking of electrical wires, all of the electrical cabling meant to light the five-mile section of freeway during the liquid nitrogen truck chase was stolen.

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Not having enough time to replace all of it, the company had to rent or borrow every wire connected to the lighting on the freeway. That lasted for five days.

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7. Arnie Wasn’t Really Naked In The Bar Scene 

In one of the first scenes of the film where the nude Terminator walks into a biker bar, Arnie was actually wearing a pair of purple board shorts.

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We guess you couldn’t just have Arnold Schwarzenegger walking around the streets with his, ahem, Terminator out could you? That would give people quite the shock.

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8. The Same Minigun Appears In Another Arnie Film

Did the minigun used in this film look somewhat familiar to you? That might be because it’s exactly the same one that was used in ‘Predator.’ The gun used the same custom Y-frame as in Predator with some modifications.

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The modified M60 fore-grip assembly was removed in its entirety. To replace it a “chainsaw” grip was mounted on the Y-frame and the M16-style carry handle was removed.

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9. Arnie Is A Bit Of A Dummy

If you look very carefully then you can see in some shots that Arnie transforms into a dummy version of himself. I guess they needed to use a prop because some things were far too dangerous.

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Talking of props, in one take of the aftermath of the motorcycle chase, Arnold Schwarzenegger accidentally hit Edward Furlong in the eye with the shotgun prop.

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10. They Actually Flew A Helicopter Under A Motorway Overpass

Unbelievably, Pilot Charles A. Tamburro actually flew a helicopter under the overpass in the final chase scene. Apparently the camera crew refused to film it because it was too dangerous, so Cameron did the filming himself with the help of a camera car driver.

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 The T-1000 has four arms while in the helicopter: two for flying the helicopter and two for firing and reloading the MP-5K submachine gun.

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11. Crew Members Make An Appearance

If you paid close attention you may also have noticed crew members wandering onto the edge of some important scenes! Talking of crew, the special effects crew had to incorporate Robert Patrick’s football-injury limp in their animation of the T-1000.

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Next, they filmed the stuff with the T-1000 pretending to be driving from the right-hand steering wheel (wearing a mirror-image police uniform), while the real driver was hidden under a black hood at the lowered real steering wheel.

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12. James Cameron Made One Change For The 3D Release Of The Film

The recent 3D release of the film featured just one change, as confirmed by Cameron himself. This was a change to the windshields that come off the truck chasing after John Connor.

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This caused is a continuity problem, as the windshield is later shown intact and then shattered, something which Cameron said had annoyed him for many years.

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13. Arnie Suffered For His Art 

During the Los Angeles River sequence, Arnold Schwarzenegger was in pain due to him not being able to wear a glove while cocking the gun. Because of this, his fingers would get stuck in the mechanism.

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Before mastering it, he tore the skin from his fingers and hand many times. He was  doing this whilst trying to act and control a Harley at the same time as James Cameron told him where to look.

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14. Someone Wondered Onto The Set By Mistake

During filming, a female passerby wondered onto the biker bar set thinking that it was real. This was despite walking past all the location trucks, cameras and lights. She saw Arnold Schwarzenegger standing in the bar dressed only in his boxer shorts.

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She asked what was going on and Arnie replied that it was male stripper night. In Terminator 3, the Terminator actually steps into a bar during make stripper night.

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15. They Created The Most Realistic Depiction of A Nuclear Fallout On Film 

The special effects team for the film studied hours of nuclear test footage to make Sarah Connor’s nuclear nightmare scene look as realistic as possible. A miniature Los Angeles was made to simulate the scene.

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It was make up of Matzos crackers and Shredder Wheat amongst other things. It would take a few days to reset the scene after a take.

In 1991, members of the U.S. federal nuclear testing lab declared it the most accurate nuclear blast created for a fictional motion picture.

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16. Linda Hamilton’s Twin Was In The Film

In the film, Linda Hamilton’s twin sister, Leslie Hamilton Gearren, was used as a double for the actress in scenes involving two “Sarah Connors.” An example of this is when the T-1000 was imitating her.

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There is also another scene that didn’t make it into the theatrical version, but did make it on to DVD, where Leslie acts as a mirror image of Linda.

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17. The Studio Were Concerned About The Rising Budget

Studio executives were worried when the original budget for the film, $75 million, inflated up to $88 million with still more to come. The studio proposed that a few scenes were cut in order to manage the ever-increasing budget. One of the scenes they proposed to cut was the opening biker bar scene.

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The studio tried to persuade Arnold to persuade James Cameron to remove it, but Schwarzenegger turned them down, saying, “Only a studio guy would cut a scene out like that.”

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18. 3.5 Minutes of Film Cost About $5.5 Million

The graphics department behind the film, Industrial Light and Magic, had to grow from six artists to almost thirty-six to accommodate all the work required to bring the T-1000 to life.

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The cost about $5.5 million and took eight months to produce, ultimately amounting to 3.5 minutes of actual screen time.

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19. They Had To Rip Off The Roof of the Semi-Truck

In the original script, it was not written that the that the top of the wrecker semi-truck would be ripped off during the chase through the storm drain, beneath the freeway.

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However, when they arrived on location, they found the cab would not fit under the overpass. As such, James Cameron decided that the roof was going to have to come off.

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20. They Had To Film Re-Shoots On Christmas Day

The scene in which the Terminator reboots after being shut down by the T-1000 was not in the script. This was only added during editing when James Cameron thought the audience would not be able to understand how the Terminator returns to deliver the final blow against the T-1000.

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Schwarzenegger was actually going to spend Christmas was Bruce Willis, but had to cancel those plans to film those crucial scenes. The scene where the Terminator pulls the impaled metal rod off was shot on Chrismtas day itself.

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21. Ken Gibbel Would Not Hit Linda Hamilton

In the Special Edition of the film, there is a scene where Ken Gibbel has to hit Linda Hamilton with his nightstick. The scene was extremely physically demanding and Hamilton was angry with Gibbel because he repeatedly botched the scene.

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Later, the actress got her revenge in a later scene where she beats Gibbel with a broken-off broom handle. These blows were for real.

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22. The First Film Nearly Ruined The Second

The idea to destroy the Cyberdyne Systems building to prevent the future was was originally going to take place in the first Terminator film. However, it was cut from the final release (although it can be seen in the deleted scenes section of the DVD.)

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Director James Cameron said it was lucky that he chose to cut it, because this formed the “nucleus” of Terminator 2: Judgement Day.

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23. Photos Of The Attack Were Made Using Still Shots of a Re-Shoot

In the film, the photos of the 1984 attack were still shots taken from a re-shoot. James Cameron got a hallway set built, dressed Arnold Schwarzenegger in his original Terminator outfit and then had him recreate one take, from which they took the pictures.

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Signs that this was taken from a reshoot can be spotted through Schwarzenegger’s hair and facial features.

24. Residents Protested Because They Believed Their Medical Center Was Becoming a Hospital For The Criminally Insane

When the film crew dressed up a Medical Centre in Lakeview Terrace as the Pescadero State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, local residents started a protest outside of it. The realised soon afterwards that it was only for the set of Terminator Two.

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25. Billy Idol Was James Cameron’s First Choice To Play The T-1000

The actor Billy Idol was Cameron’s first choice to play the T-100, but he was injured in a motorcycle accident and it prevented him from taking on the role.

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This is ironic, as the T-100 rides a motorcycle in many scenes. In Oliver Stone’s The Doors, Idol can be seen on crutches, which was released a few months before Terminator.

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26. Arnold Was Unsure About Not Being Able To Kill People

Arnold Schwarzenegger was at first dubious about the Terminator not being able to kill people. He thought that the studio was trying to soften the violence like had happened in Conan the Destroyer.

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He felt that because of this, he had destroyed the Conan franchise and didn’t want to see it happen here too. However, since the film was rater R, this put his mind at ease somewhat.

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27. The First Trailer Had A Budget Of $150,000 

James Cameron asked Stan Winston to direct a teaser trailer for the film. He didn’t want the trailer just to be comprised of early footage of the film, and so gave a $150,000 for Winston to create an original trailer.

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He created one that showed a futuristic assembly line churning out copies of Terminator, all looking like Arnold Schwarzenegger. Cameron was happy with the trailer because he feared how audiences would react to trailers showing Schwarzenegger’s return after being destroyed in the first film.

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28. The Mall Used In The Film Is Featured In Quite A Few Films

In the scene where the T-800 goes to look for John and fights the T-1000, the mall used is the Sherman Oaks Galleria and has been used in many previous films. Schwarzenegger himself filmed another fight scene there in Commando, released in 1985.

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29. An Alternative Ending Was Filmed

An alternative ending for the film was ultimately cut.

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It showed an elderly Sarah sitting at the park, telling the story about the Terminator and watching John playing with his daughters and trying her granddaughter’s shoes on.

Cameron decided not to use this, and instead replaced it with the “unknown road” ending that was used in the final cut.

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30. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Robert Patrik Never Exchanged Dialogue

Whilst the two starred in several scenes together, Arnie and Robert never actually exchanged dialogue face-to-face. The only bit of dialogue spoken between them is when the T-800 tells the frozen T-1000, “Hasta la vista, baby,” to which the T-1000 could not hear (they do, however, exchange words over the phone, with the T-800 speaking in John’s voice and the T-1000 speaking in Jenelle’s.)

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We hope you have enjoyed reading about these Terminator 2 facts! Which one was your favourite?

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